Hamlet character analysis pdf

Eugène Delacroix, Hamlet and Hamlet character analysis pdf Mother. Gertrude reveals no guilt in her marriage with Claudius after the recent murder of her husband, and Hamlet begins to show signs of jealousy towards Claudius.

According to Hamlet, she scarcely mourned her husband’s death before marrying Claudius. His father’s death and our o’erhasty marriage. In Act three, she eagerly listens to the report of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern on their attempt to cheer him, and supports the King and Polonius’ plan to watch Hamlet from a hidden vantage point as he speaks with Ophelia, with the hope that her presence will heal him. In the next act, Gertrude tells Claudius of Polonius’ murder, convinced that Hamlet is truly mad. She also shows genuine compassion and affection as she watches along with others as Ophelia sings and acts in absolute madness. At Ophelia’s burial, she expresses her former hope that the young woman might have married her son: “I hoped thou shouldst have been my Hamlet’s wife. In the final scene, Gertrude notices Hamlet is tired during the fight with Laertes, and offers to wipe his brow.

No, no, the drink,—O my dear Hamlet—The drink, the drink! Other characters’ views of the Queen are largely negative. When the Ghost of her former husband appears to Hamlet, he describes her as a “seeming virtuous queen”, but orders Hamlet not to confront her about it and leave her judgement to heaven. However, he also expresses that his love for her was benevolent as he states that he would have held back the elements if they “visited her face too roughly”. There have been numerous attempts to account for Gertrude’s state of mind during the play.

It could be argued that as she does not confess to any sins before she dies, she did not participate in her husband’s murder. However, other considerations do point to Gertrude’s complicity. HAMLET: You go not till I set you up a glass where you may see the inmost part of you. QUEEN: What wilt thou do? Thou wilt not murder me? Hamlet’s internal dilemma is Gertrude’s sinful behaviour. He states, “Shakespeare’s Hamlet is a play dealing with the effect of a mother’s guilt upon her son.

Gertrude’s own perspective on her life and the events of the play. Wyman explicitly “interrogates the nineteenth-century cult of the self-sacrificing mother”, critiquing the influence it had on interpretations of the play by both male critics and actresses playing Gertrude. Hamlet confronts his mother in her private quarters, in a sexual light. In this reading, Hamlet is disgusted by his mother’s “incestuous” relationship with Claudius while simultaneously fearful of killing him, as this would clear Hamlet’s path to his mother’s bed. 1957 essay “Hamlet’s Mother” defends Gertrude, arguing that the text never hints that Gertrude knew of Claudius poisoning King Hamlet. This analysis has been championed by many feminist critics. Heilbrun argued that men have for centuries completely misinterpreted Gertrude, believing what Hamlet said about her rather than the actual text of the play.